2010

Title
'ICT: Africa's Revolutionary Tools for the 21st Century?' CAS Annual Conference :
Date and Time
4th May 2010 09:00 5th May 2010 18:00
Location
John McIntyre Conference Centre, Edinburgh
URL
http://www.cas.ed.ac.uk/events/annual_conference/2010/cas_annual_conference_2010_-_call_for_papers

Confirmed speakers:

  • (Keynote) Jonathan Donner, Technology for Emerging Markets Group, Microsoft Research India
  • (Keynote) David Souter, Managing Director, ict Development Associates; Visiting Professor in Communications Management, University of Strathclyde; Visiting Senior Fellow, Department of Media and Communications, London School of Economics and Political Science
  • Ken Banks, kiwanja.net
  • Shola Adenekan, Centre for West African Studies, University of Birmingham
  • Fredrick Agboma, Institute of Development Policy Management, University of Manchester
  • Julie Soleil Archambault, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
  • Naluwembe Binaisa, School of Global Studies, University of Sussex
  • Stefanie Bognitz, Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology, University of Halle
  • Chambi Chachage, University of Dar es Salaam
  • Guy Collender, London International Development Centre
  • Stuart Easter, Queen Margaret University
  • Rory Ewins, Higher & Community Education, University of Edinburgh
  • Denis Galava, School of Journalism, University of Nairobi
  • Hans Hahn, Institut fÜr Historische Ethnologie, University of Frankfurt
  • Hayes Mabwearzara, School of Arts and Creative Industries, Edinburgh Napier University
  • Vanessa Malila, Institute of Communication Studies, University of Leeds
  • Marissa Mika, History and Sociology of Science, University of Pennsylvania
  • Wesley Mwatwara, Department of History, University of Zimbabwe
  • Gina Porter, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham
  • Max Schaub, St. Anne’s College, University of Oxford
  • Norman SchrÄpel, Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology, University of Halle
  • Ugo Vallauri, Royal Holloway, University of London
  • Niall Winters, Institute of Education, University of London
  • Anthony Ziba, ICTD Consulting, Edinburgh  

  On Phone

New information and communication technologies (ICTs) have taken Africa by storm. By far the highest uptake has been of mobile phones, and while rates of internet uptake in Africa have been slower, in many countries technologies that enable mobile internet access are now beginning to enter the mass market. New applications, and in some cases new devices, are also being introduced, at times in partnership between technology companies and development agencies. ICT seemingly embraces every aspect of the development spectrum, and has led to increased academic interest in the Information and Communication Technology for Development, or ICTD/ICT4D discipline.

At the same time, many Africans are using ICT – especially mobile phones – for less explicitly developmental, everyday communication that was otherwise impossible when landlines, the postal service or buses were the best options for communicating at a distance. Nowadays mobile phones are being used for more frequent communication, often over much shorter distances, and may prove to change interrelationships – not least between state and non-state actors – in unexpected ways.

Given the broad range of uses to which ICT are put, the conference organisers welcome papers that relate to the use or potential of ICT in influencing change in Africa. Papers may wish to address issues of access, adoption, or impact, and may be framed in any discipline. Topics might include, but need not be restricted to: health (including veterinary science), education/learning, livelihoods and socio-economic interaction, finance (including money transfer), culture, media, governance, or any other aspect of empowerment. Papers covering other topics will also be considered, and both theory-based and empirical papers covering any region or country in sub-Saharan Africa are welcome.


 

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