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The Chinese Motorcycles in Burkina Faso: New transnational accumulation itineraries and extraversion management

Title
The Chinese Motorcycles in Burkina Faso: New transnational accumulation itineraries and extraversion management
Speaker(s)
Speaker: Guive Khan-Mohammad # University of Geneva
Hosted by
Introduced by
Date and Time
27th Mar 2019 16:10 - 27th Mar 2019 17:30
Location
Violet Laidlaw room, 6th floor, Chrystal Macmillan Building, George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9LD
URL
http://www.cas.ed.ac.uk/events/seminar_series/2018_2019/the_chinese_motorcycles_in_burkina_faso_new_transnational_accumulation_itineraries_and_extraversion_management

This book deals with the restructuring of the motorcycle sector in Burkina Faso, which arose in the beginning of the 2000s under the pressure of the massive import of Chinese products. Providing new business opportunities, the arrival of these – cheaper – products coincided with the emergence of many new African transnational entrepreneurs. Their emergence contributed to put into question the trading hierarchies and power structures in the motorcycle sector that were in place since the independence.

To measure these changes, this book is based on a theoretical framework that fosters dialogue between works inspired by the concept of "globalization from below" as well as political sociology contributions on the State in Africa. In addition to providing detailed presentations of itineraries of accumulation and business strategies of many transnational traders and bringing a fine understanding of transformation in Burkinabe consumption practices and logics, this book focuses primarily on assessing the impact of the proliferation of these transnational entrepreneurs on the management of a central element of power in Africa: extraversion rents.

Historically, the motorcycle industry was a rent-seeking sector for Burkinabe political and economic elites. Observing how the extraversion rents are now shared between many actors allows us to highlight a shift towards a more indirect form of management. In many ways, this new rent sharing echoes the multipolarization of the extraversion process itself, which occurs under the combined pressure of a multitude of "cadets sociaux' (consumers, entrepreneurs and representatives of the state apparatus). In sum, the analysis of the restructuring of the motorcycle sector in Burkina Faso unveils the consequences of the increase of Sino-African trade in terms of political economy.

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