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On Friday 27th September SPRA will host a conversation with Clare Byarugaba from the Ugandan Civil Society Coalition on Human Rights and Constitutional Law.

In the last five years the proposal of the Anti-Homosexuality Bill in Uganda, which in its original draft included the death penalty for acts of ‘aggravated homosexuality’, has brought a huge amount of media attention. Homosexuality in Uganda is a crime, and has been so for the past century as a vestige of British colonial legislation. But beyond simplistic interpretations that have portrayed Uganda as the ‘most homophobic country in the world’ how is the everyday life for the Ugandan LGBT community? In what ways are human rights for sexual minorities debated? What is the role of activists? How much freedom of action do they have? These and further questions will be addressed during the conversation with Clare Byarugaba from the Ugandan Civil Society Coalition on Human Rights and Constitutional Law

From 12 to 1.30 pm in Chrystal MacMillan Building, School of Social Science, common room at the 6th floor   

Free event, everyone is welcome to join!

 

On Wednesday the 30th of October SPRA will sponsor the screening, followed by a debate, of the movie ‘God Loves Uganda’ at the Africa in Motion film festival in Edinburgh.

‘God loves Uganda’ (90 minutes movie) shows the American evangelical movement in Uganda, where American missionaries have been credited with both creating schools and hospitals and promoting homophobic attitudes and influencing anti-gay public policies like the bill to make homosexuality punishable by death. The film follows evangelical leaders in America and Uganda along with politicians and believers as they attempt the radical task of eliminating “sexual sin” and converting Ugandans to conservative forms of Christianity.

 

A few reflections on the passing of the Anti-Homosexuality Bill in Uganda and the role played by Evangelical churches @ the Conversation, published on the 24th of December

Read here

 

Challenging Homophobia in Africa - TEDx Saloon Talk by Dr Bompani

Increasing state sanctioned homophobia in Africa is being challenging by powerful new movements in civil society. Dr Bompani’s TEDx talk reflects on the politics, dynamics and context of both sides.

The video recorded on January 22 will be shortly available online.

 

On 14 March 2014 Dr Barbara Bompani has presented at the Work Day "Pentecostalisation of the Public Sphere" organised by the Relgion & Society group, Centre for Religion and Public Life at Leeds University.

The paper was entitled: "Transforming the Nation: Pentecostalism and the Public Sphere in Uganda". 

 

On Tuesday 21 June Dr Bompani has took part in the roundtable organised by the AEGIS (Research Network of European African Studies centres) summer school in partnerhsip with ARC (LGBTI Cagliari Organisation).

Title: Human Rights and Homophobia in Africa. Speakers: Dr Barbara Bompani – Prof Preben Kaarsholm – Prof Roberto Cherchi. Cagliari (Sardinia), Ostello Marina theatre, from 5.30 to 7.00 pm

 

 Dr Barbara Bompani will present on the theme Religion, Culture and LGBT rights in Africa at the 'LGBTI Rights in the Commonwealth', Friday 18 July.

The conference, organised by Scotland Equality Network, is held in preparation of the Commonwealth Games and it will take place in Glasgow on Friday 18 July from 9 am to 5.00 pm.

For more information and to register click here!

 

On Saturday 6th September Barbara Bompani and Caroline Valois will present at the International and Interdisciplinary Conference: Pentecostalism and Development, SOAS, London; more info here!

They will be presenting at Panel 2A: 'Pentecostalism and the Politics of Homosexuality in Africa' between 11.00 and 1.00 pm 

Bompani's paper will focus on 'Interpreting Development: Discussing Homosexuality, Progress and the Future in Pentecostal-charismatic Churches in Kampala' 

Valois' paper will focus on 'All the Single Ladies: Homosexuality, Gender & Politicised Sexuality in the Ugandan Public Sphere'

 

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